SAGES

THE SEVEN SAGES OF GREECE
These pre-Socratics survive only in enigmatic fragments.

Pittacus of Mitylene (c.650 – c.570 BCE)  ‘Know thine opportunity’

Solon of Athens (638 – 559 BCE)  ‘Know Thyself’

Thales of Miletus (c.642 – c.545 BCE) ‘Who hateth suretyship is sure’

Periander of Corinth (died 585 BCE)  ‘Nothing is impossible to industry’

Chilon of Sparta (sixth century BCE)  ‘Consider the end’

Bias of Prinene (sixth century BCE)  ‘Most men are bad’

Cleobus of Lindoe (sixth century BCE)  ‘The golden mean’ or ‘Avoid extremes’

In Athens of the fourth century BCE, empirical science held little appeal. Socrates had an aversion to natural philosophy.

PLATO celebrated mathematics but opposed any form of experimentation.
ARISTOTLE was more receptive to natural philosophy, but practiced little experimentation or even observation.

GREEK PHILOSOPHERSPHILOSOPHERS